Alone after the home run

I thought we would have learned how to live with each other now, this alien band of brothers that have come to visit. I knew it would be an extended stay but now I fear my guests are bent on overstaying my forced welcome. I’ve tried to get to know them all, they who have come knocking at my door. Grief, Depression, Guilt and Loneliness. They’ve hung around for so long I swear their faces had begun to morph into one another. I can hardly tell them apart and it hardly mattered, given that they’ve all wrought the same devastation on my once peaceful spirit. I’ve engaged with them, maniacally so, trying to understand how they’ve managed to convince my husband that he had nothing to live for. As the days passed I’ve come to understand the conversation they had with Beau and where it brought him. But the longer they stay with me I am beginning to dread where I would be, if, when and how I manage to push them to leave.

I’ve let myself go because I could not let him go. I drink too much coffee, smoke too much, exercise too little. I eat nothing but indulgent poison — the most luxurious of desserts, laden with gargantuan amounts of sugar, chocolate and butter; evil disguised in swirls of happy colored icing, beautiful bronze baked goodies that promise familiar highs, only to be sunk back into an even more dismal abyss when the sugar rush disappears. I need a haircut. I’ve moved back in with the ‘rents and need to start organizing the mess of my life which I had brought with me. I am on a deadline, the time I’ve borrowed from sympathetic employers was running out too fast for comfort and I seem to be on pause. Indeed, time waits for no one and life is in an ironic rush. What does it matter that life as I knew it had changed drastically and without warning?

In the beginning I had gotten on that same train of mad, frantic activity. And everyone was there, cheering from the bleachers as I rushed to cover all the bases. And I did just that.

I tried to understand what happened. I researched, read, consulted, conversed and concluded. Beau was a victim of suicide. The end result of a long fight with major depression likely caused by a genetic predisposition. He could have possibly been bi-polar or had borderline personality disorder; complicated by the trauma of losing a father at an age when he was only beginning to learn about the relationship of “cause and effect”. Freud had discovered it, the construct of “learned helplessness” where a child, unable to process the traumatic event, learns that there are things that happen in this world that are beyond our control and therefore, when challenges come up, no matter how small, he would be powerless to fight it. He told me once before that he had watched his father burn. A child watching a cremation is a nightmarish tableau. Whether it had actually happened is of no consequence. For Beau, it was his reality. Had he agreed to seek professional help he would have discovered he was suffering from post traumatic stress syndrome as well. My own therapists say it would have been a textbook diagnosis, what with the death happening the day after his birthday and the constant reminder of his father’s ashes in the family home. There were other reminders, other questions, too private to share, that had left wounds that festered. He had grown into the body of a man and yet, somewhere inside him, an 11 year old boy continued to stare into the flames.

Apparently there had been prior attempts to take his life before I had even met him, usually triggered by a relationship gone awry. He feared rejection and magnified abandonment, attaching all sense of hope to relationships that he perceived in his mind to be all that he had in his life. I had saved him twice he said, having talked him through the demise of two of his past romances. He had always threatened to end his life at the end of his relationships. I had always thought he meant I had saved him figuratively. Now I know better, too late.

Even if I had known his threats to be true, I would have thought marriage would have put an end to the suicide ideations. After all, the promise of forever keeps the threat of abandonment at bay. And for all intents and purposes, as far as I knew, we had been the giddiest kids on the marriage block. But I suppose all marriages have its own challenges, and the monster that lay dormant inside him waited for the opportunity to rear its ugly head.

I had always envied him for his freedom of spirit. I was jealous that he had built a life of simplicity doing what he loved. But even before we had gotten married he had always talked about wanting to do something else, to find his fortunes elsewhere and to keep climbing as a hobby rather than his career. It had been frustrating for him, and I knew that the conservative man that he truly was, he wanted to prove that he could provide for me somewhat. There was never any pressure on this front, at least not outwardly, and not that I was consciously aware of, although I know that sometimes circumstance itself could create them. I had tried to control the situation at any sign of insecurity, although if there were any, he was such master at keeping them from me that despite my vigilance, it was only in the last three months of his life that I recognized any discontent. I had supported him by asking him to simply pursue what he was passionate about. There was much trial and error but in the end he had still hoped against hope that he could make something out of the sport that he loved. I believe it was his failure to make this happen that was the trigger for his last and final episode.

He loved bouldering. And the competition which had been named after him was his pride and joy. He had attempted to put up the event a year into our marriage. It had pushed through but at great cost. He had taken it hard, given that I had to step in to bail him out. He declared he was done with the competition, done with climbing in general and moved on. or so I thought. A year after he announced he was going to try to put the event up again and against my better judgment, I supported him once again. This time, despite his constant assurances that the postponements and delays with sponsorship contracts were just minor snags, the event did not push through. We argued about it for a day or two and I thought that was the end of it. But apparently he had again talked to some people about taking his life out of shame and embarrassment. I thought he had gotten over that particular hill, he had decided to embark on a new challenge — to get certified as a personal trainer. But now I know this only added to the weight he carried. He had put all his hope in that basket, telling me repeatedly during those days when his frustration and stress were poisoning our marriage that it was all he had going for him. I tried to refocus his thinking and emotions into positive things, to the dreams we had created together for the future, but he was incapable of looking forward and insisted on collapsing into the past. In retrospect I know now that nothing I said would have made a difference. Unless he was given the medication he needed, he was spiraling out of control towards his own self destruction.

You would think that all of the above would absolve me of my guilt. It does not. A psychiatrist would describe him as a textbook case and any diligent researcher armed with an internet connection and a laptop would agree. The illness is what killed him. It was not anybody’s fault. He was psychologically disturbed and did not have the skills to deal with life’s challenges. Cerebrally it all makes a lot of sense. But as his wife, I look at what happened with different lenses. And what a different story my heart can see.

I remember a man excited for a future. I remember a husband narcissistically proud of a happy marriage. I remember conversations about the children we were going to raise, the trips we were going to take, the long bucket list of things we needed to do. My heart cannot accept what all the research and professional consultations have logically confirmed. I have hit a home run with all the bases loaded. But now the bleachers are empty, the game is over. Everyone has gone on to their homes and life continues on. The numbers on my blog have dwindled. The hundreds of likes and comments of support on my Facebook page have all but disappeared. Very few ask how I am anymore. And I sit in the ball park alone, enveloped in the blackness left by the shut down of the stadium lights.

They wait for me, my unwanted guests. Grief, Depression, Guilt and Loneliness. They took my husband away and now they await me. I am beginning to dread where I would be after all is said and done. Because as of now I am back on first base. Bleachers empty. Alone after a cerebral home run that has done nothing to heal the pain in my heart. Beau is gone. Game over.

4 thoughts on “Alone after the home run

  1. Hello, you may remember meeting me once at your grandfather’s birthday party several years back. I completely empathize with you. I have a story too… Many years ago I married my late wife, Inga, a beautiful and intelligent woman, I knew that she had a history of bipolar but once I had met her I fell in love and we married, and a year later we were blessed with a wonderful daughter “Anna”. In the year 2000, we celebrated Anna’s 17 th birthday, her acceptance in to Stanford, but was also the same month and year we buried dear Inga. Inga didn’t die from her bipolar but she suffered from it again the last year of her life due to a medical illness that complicated her bipolar treatment with lithium. It has been years now and I have started a new life with Patricia, but I know the conflicts and complicated grief one may have with the sudden death of a loved one with bipolar. It is a special kind of loss, because there is so much guilt, the the reminder of our inability to help a person with an incurable disease. It takes time to deal with all this, shortcuts with grief therapies may help but time and distance will probably be the cure, if there is such a thing. I have a wound, I don’t feel it all the time but sometimes I am reminded this “grief” when things come up in life, I am thankful the depression I get is not as bad. Major depression, and bipolar are linked to familial dna, in both our families, my hope is that it will skip the next generation or more effective treatments be available. I also hope you will not be so hard on yourself, you did not kill him, it was the disease that did it. Albert

    • Thank you Albert! Of course I remember you. Ging is my mom’s best friend! Thank you for sharing your story too. Sometimes I am guilty, other times in disbelief and wonder. Yet other times I am simply angry that he had left me this way. Up to know, two months after to date, I still ask what happened. His suicide came from left field. It took me by surprise even though he had repeatedly kept telling me his intention of doing it. It isn’t that I never took him seriously because I did. it just that I guess I never really thought it would happen to us and I really didn’t see any problem difficult enough to have pushed him to do it.He kept saying he did not know himself what the problem was and I am having difficulty accepting that. There are theories and studies that explain depression, mental illness and suicide… but to reach understanding is not quite as simple as reading about it and taking it all in as fact. I suppose each case of suicide is a “unique” case. Despite the similarities, with all suicide survivors asking “why”, the answers are so individual and yet equally unsatisfying.

      Anna

  2. Hi Anna, I read your posts to learn from your insights, life and love lessons, and find parallels on dealing with events beyond our control. Your writing is moving and you stick to things real. Please keep on sharing your journey. Blessings and all, Lala

    • Thank you Lala. I am in a place I’ve never been before. It is surreal to not want to move, to be unable to plan for more than just the day ahead of you, if even. Sometimes I cannot see past the next hour. I alternate between panicking because of my unreadiness to go back to the routine of “normal” life and not caring at all what happens if I choose to just throw everything else away. Sometimes it doesn’t really matter anymore. Life sometimes doesn’t matter anymore. I am largely unstable and he was my rock. Where does that leave me? I still don’t know. 😦

      anna

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